My Senior Goodbye @The_BV

It is customary for graduating senior editors to write a goodbye editorial as their final sign off from The Bona Venture. Here is my published attempt at a goodbye to one of the greatest influences on my journalism career to date.

I’m not very good at this.

The whole writing about myself thing was never my strong suit. I’ve never splashed myself across the pages of The Bona Venture with any lessons learned. I’ve never mentioned a personal detail or a life lesson which imparted words of wisdom in an editorial.

Words of wisdom?

Please, I’m still trying to figure out Internet banking. I’ve called the bank’s service company for my password at least eight times this semester.

Not to mention cleaning my room and doing laundry typically count as real accomplishments for a day. I even check it off the to-do list to feel like a champ. Nothing more exciting than crossing that s– off in a vibrant lime green highlighter.

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Digital Media Education Dedication

Photo courtesy of sonicko.com

I remember a time when the tools were just there to be used without purpose or strategy. That the conversation alone was sufficient. Now, strategic measures are necessary to promote messages and information along the inter-webs. Introducing new tools, new messages and new methods to communicate the news or to market your brand.

Two way conversation between consumer and producer – through tools such as Twitter, Facebook, blogs and video – are beneficial and necessary in today’s current communication’s world. To build connections, consistent posting and interaction are key to build my professional brand.

In pursuit of a greater brand image, I’ve developed my Twitter account, bought my own domain name brand, jkumor, and increased posting frequency. I’ve learned how to link articles and create video shorts.

Digital media has become a new venture I am happy to facilitate as I travel through the world of communications. I’ve attained the skills and knowledge to pioneer the tools strategically for whatever company or news organizations I work for in the future.

Beyond Bonas

Is the idea of searching for a “grown-up” job adding stress to your life?

To ease those worry wrinkles, St. Bonaventure University’s Career Center hosted “Beyond Bonaventure: Where do I go from here?” on Friday, Feb. 11, in the Hall of Fame Room.

Image courtesy of Investor Centric Blog

“Beyond Bonaventure” is just one of the programs provided by the Career Center, which is attempting to ensure Bonaventure
graduates are not part of the 8 percent of recent college graduates unemployed in the U.S., according to a May 24 article in the New York Times.

The event featured a young alumni panel presentation and a student-alumni networking reception.

The alumni panel was composed of five recent graduates including Jordan Steves, ’09; Amber Pietrobono, ’09, ’10; Bob Gohn, ’10; Michael Avillo, ’09; and Craig W. Montanye, ’07.

Each alum offered advice on getting a job, keeping a job and what life is like after finally leaving the 14778 zip code.

All five alumni suggested students focus on networking and getting in the game early.

“The Bonaventure network has been amazing for me,” said Pietrobono, a brand marketing associate at Fisher-Price. “Pull on that connection, through friends, family and other alumni – you never know who could be the next person forwarding your résumé along.”

Avillo personally used networking to his advantage his second semester senior year to land an interview at BBDO in New York City and started his career as an account executive with them by June 2007. All through the power of networking, he said.

One tip given by the panel was to start your job search before the second semester of your senior year. According to Montanye, a financial analyst for The Avco Company, a Goldman Sachs Company, this offers more time for you and the company to interview each other, and it gets you ahead of many of your peers.

As for the interviewing process, Gohn, an account coordinator for Text 100 Global Public Relations, and Montanye offered students pieces of advice.

Gohn believes acting open and being yourself at an interview distinguishes yourself from other candidates.

“(If the interviewer) asks you a question, don’t be afraid to say you don’t have an answer,” Montanye said. “Instead say, ‘I don’t have an answer now, but later if you want I can e-mail one to you.'”

It shows follow-through and a real interest in the job to answer like that, he said. That answer is much better than making an answer up on the fly and potentially being wrong.

Steves, a lecture associate and assistant editor at the Chatauqua Institution, often interviews potential employees himself and recommends asking questions, speaking clearly and dressing professionally.

“Those are important qualities to getting a job,” he said.

As for the life outside of work, the alumni agreed that keeping in contact with friends after Bonaventure and maintaining a social life after work can be difficult.

“It’s a different world outside of Bonaventure,” Gohn said. “People (I work with) are getting married, having kids – At first, I was like ‘What’s happening? Three weeks ago it was Senior Week at Bonaventure and I was on a couch outside at 3 a.m.”

Opportunities to connect can be found through social media websites, e-mail, planned road trips and getting involved in your local community.

“Remember, life is a balance, and you don’t want to burn out by the time you turn 25,” Montanye said. “Work and play are equally important.”

For more information on careers, networking, resumes, practice interviews and future events, contact the Career Center at career@sbu.edu.

Article published by The Bona Venture

Issue date 2/18/2011

Enrollment shows influx of new students

St. Bonaventure University increased enrollment for the fall 2010 semester, Ann Lehman, registrar, wrote in an e-mail.

Total enrollment for the fall 2010 semester was 2,519, an increase of 253 students from the spring 2010 semester’s 2,266, Lehman wrote.

More than 800 new students enrolled at the university this semester, Kathryn Dillon Hogan, associate vice president of enrollment, wrote in an e-mail.

The boost in enrollment is attributed to an increase in the number of freshmen, transfer students and graduate students from fall 2009 to fall 2010.

Enrolled for the semester are 523 graduate students, with 1,996 undergrads; an increase from the spring 2010 semester’s enrollment of 1,831 undergraduates.

Bonaventure welcomed 92 new transfer students, Lehman wrote, and retained 80.4 percent of the freshman from the previous academic year.

“Retention is the result of efforts by all areas of the university community,” Nancy Casey, director of First-Year Experience, wrote in an e-mail. “On a campus such as ours, it is fostered by providing positive residential and social environments that complement and support challenging academic experiences.”

Casey suggested the First-Year Experience played a key role in retaining students.

“The First-Year Experience is continuing to support positive transition … by offering programming in academic areas, collaborating with residence life and other areas of the university,” Casey wrote.

Published by The Bona Venture on Sept. 24, 2010

http://media.www.thebv.org/media/storage/paper1111/news/2010/09/24/News/Enrollment.Shows.Influx.Of.New.Students-3935828.shtml

Photo honor

The Defense: The War of 1812

I was chosen, among 11 other students, to have their work featured on the ‘photography’ wall located in St. Bonaventure University’s Russell J. Jandoli School of Journalism and Mass Communication building. It is an honor to display my work publicly, and I enjoy the recognition immensely. 🙂

Blaze teaches fire safety

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Members of the Allegany Fire Department set fire to a mock dorm room on the front lawn of Devereux Hall Wednesday in an effort to educate students on fire safety.

The 8-foot-by-8-foot room constructed of plywood and plaster was furnished with a bed, microwave, desk, extension cords and other legal and illegal accessories typically found in a dorm room.

The fire ravaged the room in just 2 minutes and 45 seconds; all contents were turned into a mass of charred remains and melted twisted plastic.

“Fire safety is a primary concern,” Ralph Aloia, a fire and life safety officer, said. “It just takes one minute for a fire to get out of control.”

The Allegany Fire Department, the Medical Emergency Response Team and Safety and Security volunteered personnel and materials to assist during the blaze.

The mock dorm fire cost less than $300 out of the fire and safety budget, Vito Czyz, director of Safety and Security, said.

Czyz took the time before the demonstration to explain to students the importance of fire safety. He said the loss of a life to a fire breaking out is preventable with smart choices and education.

“I report at least one fire safety hazard a day,” Aloia said. “Typically, it is an exit light out, doors propped open, but unfortunately, this campus’ No. 1 problem is the tampering of fire safety devices such as fire extinguishers. That is a life safety device, and tampering with them can get people arrested for it.”

Along with the visual of the burning mock dorm room, Safety and Security gave out pamphlets on fire safety awareness.

“Watching that fire made me so nervous, I’m going to sleep with one eye open and check my smoke detector,” said Hayley Calcagno, a sophomore.

“Many students are unaware of what will produce these flames,” Czyz said. “Alcohol, cooking, smoking and the use of extension cords are all sources of dorm room fires. I hope this demonstration educates them, and they make fire safety apart of their daily lives.”

Matt Schweiger, a freshman, said he now has the right perspective about fire safety.

“I was really surprised about just how fast it all went up,” Schweiger said. “It just took a minute for the smoke and flame to cover everything. This definitely put fire safety in perspective, and I hope they do this next year.”

Approximately 200 onlookers attended the mock dorm fire, according to Czyz.

“There are over 3,000 dorm fires a year, averaging 40 deaths across the United States on college campuses alone,” Czyz said. “Many of them are alcohol-related.

“We hope this really drives home to students how important fire safety is,” Czyz said.

Emily Magavern contributed to the reporting of this story.

Published by The Bona Venture on Sept. 17, 2010

http://media.www.thebv.org/media/storage/paper1111/news/2010/09/17/News/Blaze.Teaches.Fire.Safety-3932687.shtml